Cooling from Biomass

Absorption Chillers

Thermal energy from a Biomass boiler can be utilised to produce cooling or freezing down to temperatures as low as -60c using an Absorption Chiller.

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How do they work?

There are different types of absorption chillers but they all share a similar principle. A absorption fluid is evaporated in a low pressure system, removing heat from the chilled water. Then a heat source is used to regenerate the absorption solution.

Why use an absorption chiller

Biomass boilers can produce lots of energy at a low cost per kwh, and economies of scale with biomass mean that a biomass boiler suitably sized can provide the energy required for a heating and cooling application at a low cost per kwh compared to fossil fuel or electric heating and cooling solutions.

What about the Support Scheme for Renewable Heat (SSRH)?

Combined heating and cooling systems will still receive the biomass support scheme for renewable heat incentive for the eligible heat uses on the installation, whereas ineligible uses of heat from the biomass boiler will not receive the incentive.

What about power?

If power is required, a Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) generator can also be installed on the same system creating a biomass Combined Heat, Power and Cooling (CHPC) system covering all energy requirements for businesses with industrial energy requirements for heat, power and cooling from renewable biomass. Whilst still receiving the Support Scheme for Renewable Heat (SSRH) incentive for the eligible heat uses on the installation.

Does it have to be heat from a Biomass?

The heat used to power an absorption chiller does not have to come from a biomass boiler, it can come from any source including a combined heat and power engine, or gas turbine. However using an absorption chiller with a biomass boiler removes reliance from fossil fuels and is a step towards decentralised self-energy generation.